Place of the week – The Northern Lights – Aurora Borealis

The Northern Lights (Aurora Borealis) are visible in Iceland from September until April.




The best time in the day to see them is around 9 pm till 2 am.
There is a strong connection between the solar winds and the Northern Lights. The lights are caused by the speed of the solar winds, and the direction and magnitude of their magnetic fields.






Many tour operators in Iceland offer mystery evening tours “to hunt for the Northern Lights”.




The Northern Lights can only be seen on a clear night.

Place of the week – Þverá in Laxárdal North Iceland

Place of the week this time is Þverá in Laxárdalur, North Iceland by road no 856.




At Þverá is a traditional turf house built in 1849-1851. All of Iceland´s remaining turf houses now belong to our National Museum and are a part of the National Museum’s Historic Buildings Collection.




Þverá turf house has belonged to the museum since 1968 and it was preserved in 1990.




There is an old church at Þverá, built 1878.




This photo is from the church window showing the old turf house at Þverá.




Photo Regína Hrönn Ragnarsdóttir

Place of the week – Shark Museum at Bjarnarhöfn West Iceland

The place of this week is the Shark Museum at Bjarnarhöfn. It is located on the northern side of Snaefellsnes Peninsula, by road 54.




Shark fishing and the production of shark meat has been a part of the family at Bjarnarhöfn for generations. It has long been a vital part of of the lives and the economic lifeline for the family.



Guests are invited to take a personally guided tour of the museum and will see the preparation of shark meat first hand when their guide accompanies them to the drying house. Shark meat (hákarl) and dried fish (harðfiskur) may be purchased at the museum.



Sample a taste while you’re there – you know you want to!

Place of the week – Snæfellsjökull Glacier in West Iceland

Snæfellsjökull is a 700,000-year-old stratovolcano with a glacier covering its summit.




It is situated on the most western part of the Snæfellsnes peninsula. It can easily been seen from the city of Reykjavík over the bay of Faxaflói, at a distance of 120 km.




The mountain is one of the most famous sites of Iceland, primarily due to the novel Journey to the Center of the Earth (1864) by Jules Verne, in which the protagonists find the entrance to a passage leading to the center of the earth on Snæfellsjökull.




The mountain is included in the Snæfellsjökull National Park. In August 2012 the summit was ice-free for the first time in recorded history.